Welcome!

•2011/03/08 • Comments Off

Thank you for visiting. I hope that my forays into telescope making and amateur astronomy can somehow assist others in their quest to learn more about this wonderful hobby.

– Jason Hissong

Support your local astronomy club!

I am a member of the

Columbus
Astronomical Society
I also volunteer at

Perkins
Observatory

Alberio 2 Rising

•2015/03/09 • Leave a Comment
Alberio 2 Rising

Alberio 2 Rising

Globular Rising

•2015/03/09 • Leave a Comment
Globular Rising

Globular Rising

Alberio

•2015/03/09 • Leave a Comment
Alberio

Alberio

High Above Lake Erie

•2015/03/09 • Leave a Comment
High above Lake Erie

High above Lake Erie

Meteor Burst Communications and the Perseid Meteor Shower

•2014/08/13 • Leave a Comment

Meteor Scatter at N8XELooking at the forecast, I knew this evening would not be a night to enjoy the annual Perseid Meteor Shower visually.  Plus, a nearly full moon would wash out all but the brightest meteors.  So what does one do in this situation?  Try their hand at Meteor Burst Communications!

Many may not realize that you can bounce radio waves off of the ionization left over from meteors that burn through our atmosphere.  When you see these visually, it is the green “afterglow” that is left behind.  The brightest of meteors leave a very distinctive trail.  There are many more that are not seen visually, but the short burst can still be used to effectively communicate.  With computers with soundcards, and the appropriate software, signals can be transmitted and received on a semi regular basis. The government has been using it for a while now in remote locations in Alaska and amateur radio operators use it to communicate long distances via VHF frequencies.

So to make lemonade out of lemons, I was able to enjoy the Perseid Meteor Shower even when it was cloudy.  I was able to contact a station in Massachusetts and Minnesota.

 

 

•2014/07/22 • Leave a Comment
First Light With the New Mirror Box

First Light With the New Mirror Box

After a couple coats of Rustoleum paint, I assembled the mirror box and tried it out for the first time.  I was worried that the truss poles would be too short because the truss seats were farther apart than they were when I used three struts.  I discovered that my concern was unfounded.  All my eyepieces came to focus.  The balance was slightly off, but nothing a few pounds on the mirror box would not fix.

I am glad that I have gone with a classic mirror box with eight struts.  The new configuration is solid as a rock, I can use a shroud without having to use something to keep the shroud out of the light path and I can use my mirror cell.  I will post some more detailed pictures of the finished mirror box and telescope soon.

Stellafane Dobsonian Plans

•2014/07/16 • Leave a Comment
Stellafane Dobsonian made by Ken Slater

Stellafane Dobsonian made by Ken Slater (photo credit: Stellafane)

During one of my idle moments at work, I was browsing the Stellafane website, which I have not done in a while, and discovered that they have made an excellent set of plans for making a classic Dobsonian.  The adjustable cradle is especially nice.  I plan to build an 8″ scope for my friend this way and also may build a 6″ scope which I have a few of them laying around.

 
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